Egypt 2011: The Valley of the Kings and the Approach to the Pyramids of Giza

The Valley of the Kings is an archaeologist’s dream but was something of a disappointment to us in 2011. It is a collection of tombs that a number of Pharaohs had constructed for themselves in the hope of guaranteeing their survival into the afterlife. The god Osiris had a lot to do with this because Osiris, according to Egyptian myth, was resurrected from the dead and the Pharaohs thought this divinity was the source of their own enormous power. So they devised various means of having themselves buried, including leaving their treasures and artifacts in their tombs. thereby carrying them from this world to the next (they could take it with them, or so they thought). Inevitably these tombs were robbed even by some of those who built them, a tradition that apparently continues to this day.

All this happened during the so-called New Kingdom, a period roughly from 1500-1300 BCE when Egypt, whose power then extended all the way to the Euphrates River in present-day Iraq, was for the most part at peace. A good many of the artifacts to be seen in these tombs were not available to us because they were closed or the archaeologists were working in them.

We left the Valley of the Kings for the international airport at Luxor for a return flight to Cairo, where our first tourist stop was Giza and the Pyramids. What impresses most about the Pyramids is their age. As far as we are from the time of Jesus, that’s how far in time Jesus was from the Pyramids.

Our first sight of the Pyramids
Closer Up
Even Closer Up

The first photo of the next post will be the gathering of the camels, followed by photos of guess-who riding one. If you think it was me, you’re wrong. I was too scared..